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Theresa Coletti

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Emeritus Professor, English

(301) 405-7853

3224 Tawes Hall
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Research Expertise

Medieval and Renaissance

Publications

Mary Magdalene and the Drama of Saints: Theater, Gender, and Religion in Late Medieval England

A sinner-saint who embraced then renounced sexual and worldly pleasures; a woman who, through her attachment to Jesus, embodied both erotic and sacred power; a symbol of penance and an exemplar of contemplative and passionate devotion

English

Lead: Theresa Coletti
Dates:

A sinner-saint who embraced then renounced sexual and worldly pleasures; a woman who, through her attachment to Jesus, embodied both erotic and sacred power; a symbol of penance and an exemplar of contemplative and passionate devotion: perhaps no figure stood closer to the center of late medieval debates about the sources of spiritual authority and women's contribution to salvation history than did Mary Magdalene, and perhaps nowhere in later medieval England was cultural preoccupation with the Magdalene stronger than in fifteenth-century East Anglia. Looking to East Anglian texts including the N-Town Plays, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Revelations of Julian of Norwich, and Bokenham's Legend of Holy Women, Coletti explores how the gendered symbol of Mary Magdalene mediates tensions between masculine and feminine spiritual power.

Mary Magdalene and the Drama of Saints: Theater, Gender, and Religion in Late Medieval England

A sinner-saint who embraced then renounced sexual and worldly pleasures; a woman who, through her attachment to Jesus, embodied both erotic and sacred power.

English

Lead: Theresa Coletti
Dates:
A symbol of penance and an exemplar of contemplative and passionate devotion: perhaps no figure stood closer to the center of late medieval debates about the sources of spiritual authority and women's contribution to salvation history than did Mary Magdalene, and perhaps nowhere in later medieval England was cultural preoccupation with the Magdalene stronger than in fifteenth-century East Anglia.

Naming the Rose: Eco, Medieval Signs, and Modern Theory

Theresa Coletti, a medievalist with a special interest in modern critical theory, asserts that Eco has made a significant contemporary statement about language, meaning responsible intellectual activity, and the nature of critical discourse.

English

Lead: Theresa Coletti
Dates:
"A textile of other texts, a 'whodunit' of quotations, a book built of books." So Umberto Eco has described his phenomenally successful novel The Name of the Rose, Theresa Coletti, a medievalist with a special interest in modern critical theory, asserts that Eco, by means of a concrete rendering of medieval social and intellectual life, has made a significant contemporary statement about language, meaning responsible intellectual activity, and the nature of critical discourse. Naming the Rose explores the implications of the unusual status of Eco's novel- at once a highly sophisticated novel of ideas and a best-selling work of detective fiction- perceiving in its problematic reception and hybrid nature reflection of the cultural and theoretical issues with which Eco is concerned.

Naming the Rose: Eco, Medieval Signs, and Modern Theory

It is meaningful that two books dealing with Eco's cult novel, and published almost at the same time, should bear the same main title: Naming the Rose.

English

Lead: Theresa Coletti
Dates:
Theresa Coletti's study is a rigorous development of a seminal idea: as she states in the Introduction, she wants to show that "out of a concrete rendering of medieval society and intellectual life Eco . . . crafts a distinctly contemporary statement about language and meaning."