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Scott Wible

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Associate Professor, English

(301) 405-3760

1220C Tawes Hall
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Research Expertise

Language, Writing and Rhetoric

Scott Wible's research exploring the intersections of language diversity and public policy has appeared in College Composition and Communication, College English, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, and Cultural Studies. His book Shaping Language Policy in the U.S.: The Role of Composition Studies (Southern Illinois University Press, 2013), which won the 2014 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Award, analyzes the political and educational implications of the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s language policy statements.

He is currently at work on a new research project that examines how writing studies can productively engage the entrepreneurship and innovation initiatives currently reshaping U.S. higher education.

Scott directs the Professional Writing Program and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in rhetorical theory, composition studies, and professional writing.

Awards & Grants

Advancement of Knowledge Award

The Advancement of Knowledge Award is presented annually for the empirical research publication in the previous two years that most advances writing studies.

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Award Organization: Conference on College Composition and Communication
Dates:
A work eligible for the 2021 award will have been published in calendar year 2019 or 2020. To be eligible for the award, a nominee must be a member of CCCC and/or NCTE at the time of nomination. To nominate a publication for the award, the author, editor, publisher, or reader must be a CCCC and/or NCTE member.

Publications

"Rhetorical Activities of Global Citizens."

Dating back to at least ancient Greece, rhetoric scholars and teachers have sought, in the words of Isocrates, to develop in students the skills and knowledges that will enable them “to govern wisely both [their] own households and the commonwealth.”

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
Such an education would help students to obtain a deep understanding of subjects related to civic life, such as the law, political philosophy, and ethics. Equally as important, this rhetorical education would give students practice in a broad range of strategies for deliberating with other citizens about public matters. And, finally, through such rhetorical education students ideally would be exposed to and learn to inhabit the culture’s values, commonplaces, and worldviews.

Shaping U.S. Language Policy: The Role of Composition Studies

In Shaping Language Policy in the U.S.:

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
The 1974 Students’ Right to Their Own Language resolution and the 1988 National Language Policy.

Shaping Language Policy in the U.S.: The Role of Composition Studies

In Shaping Language Policy in the U.S.: The Role of Composition Studies, author Scott Wible explores the significance and application of two of the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s key language policy statements

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:

In Shaping Language Policy in the U.S.: The Role of Composition Studies, author Scott Wible explores the significance and application of two of the Conference on College Composition and Communication’s key language policy statements: the 1974 Students’ Right to Their Own Language resolution and the 1988 National Language Policy. Wible draws from a wealth of previously unavailable archived material and professional literature to offer for the first time a comprehensive examination of these policies and their legacies that continue to shape the worlds of rhetoric, politics, and composition.

Wible demonstrates the continued relevance of the CCCC’s policies, particularly their role in influencing the recent, post-9/11 emergence of a national security language policy. He discusses in depth the role the CCCC’s language policy statements can play in shaping the U.S. government’s growing awareness of the importance of foreign language education, and he offers practical discussions of the policies’ pedagogical, professional, and political implications for rhetoric and composition scholars who engage contemporary debates about the politics of linguistic diversity and language arts education in the United States. Shaping Language Policy in the U.S. reveals the numerous ways in which the CCCC language policies have usefully informed educators’ professional practices and public service and investigates how these policies can continue to guide scholars and teachers in the future.

Read more at the publisher's website.

“Composing Alternatives to a National Security Language Policy.”

Speaking before the 2006 US University Presidents' Summit on Interna tional Education, President George W. Bush unveiled the National Security Language Initiative (NSLI), which put $114 million toward efforts to im prove language education as a means to s

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
This initiative aims to expand the number of Americans mastering what military and intelligence officials have labeled" critical-need" languages, particularly Arabic, Chinese, Rus sian, Hindi, and Farsi. Throughout his speech, President Bush talked about foreign language education as a means to protect the United States in the short-term by" defeating [terrorists] in foreign battlefields so they don't strike us here at home."

“Professor Burke’s Bennington Project.”

Kenneth Burke claimed in 1952 that he viewed his rhetorical theory and critical method as a "Bennington Project," a sign that he attributed a measure of his intellectual success to teaching at pragmatist-inspired Bennington College.

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
Studying Burke's teaching at Bennington can help scholars to better understand his theory and method because Burke taught undergraduates his own critical reading practices, ones that he believed heightened students' awareness of terministic screens and deepened their appreciation for the consequences of human symbol-use.

“Pedagogies of the ‘Students’ Right’ Era: The Language Curriculum Research Group’s 
Project for Linguistic Diversity.”

This essay examines a Brooklyn College-based research collective that placed African American languages and cultures at the center of the composition curriculum.

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
Recovering such pedagogies challenges the perception of the CCCC's 1974 "Students' Right to Their Own Language" resolution as a progressive theory divorced from the everyday practices and politics of the composition classroom.

Media advocates, Latino citizens and niche cable The limits of ‘no limits’ TV

In Shot in America, Chon Noriega calls for the study of media activism’s work ‘within the system’ of state institutions and for analysis of the relationships between media activism, the television industry and government policies.

English

Lead: Scott Wible
Dates:
This article uses a cultural policy studies focus to answer this call and map the deregulated terrain upon which media advocacy groups must now operate. Liberal governance demands that media advocates find means other than state-directed appeals to advance their agendas. As such, this essay examines the efforts of several Latino advocacy groups to garner viewer support for a Latino-themed cable television show, Resurrection Boulevard, and to use the series as a vehicle for increased Latino participation in the television industry.