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"Where Do You Know From? Antiracist Pedagogies"

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"Where Do You Know From? Antiracist Pedagogies"

College of Arts and Humanities | English Monday, August 24, 2020 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Professor Eugenia Zuroski (Associate Professor, McMaster University, Canada) and Aisha Wilks (PhD Student, McMaster University) discuss Antiracist pedagogies, beginning with Zuroski’s essay, "Where Do You Know From?’: An Exercise in Placing Ourselves Together in the Classroom." 

Q&A moderated by Lee Konstantinou and Tita Chico.

For more information contact: Tita Chico (tchico@umd.edu).
Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, the Stringer Speaker Series, the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and the Graduate School.

           
Bios
Eugenia Zuroski is Associate Professor of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University, Editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and author of A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Hovering, Seen (Toronto: Anstruther Press, 2019). She also published “Holding Patterns: On Academic Knowledge and Labor,” an essay about refusing the neoliberal university's treatment of race as "value added," and insisting on it as a foundation of knowledge and expertise.
 
Aisha Rose Wilks is a PhD student in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University. A recipient of the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, she is interested in diasporic kinship, embodiment, and the intimacies of violence in contemporary fiction. Her doctoral research takes place at the intersection of Black Studies and Mad Studies, exploring madness as a response to, recapitulation of, and refuge from the carceral-colonial state in literature of the Black Transatlantic. In her pedagogical practice, Aisha draws on her relationships to/in Tkaronto (Toronto), in Dish with One Spoon territory, and Jamaica; five years of anti-oppressive, feminist work in the non-profit sector; and an enduring sense of ambivalence to foster access and equity. She is on Twitter @most_articulate.
 

Follow the Conversation @UMDEnglish

#antiracismUMD
#CLCS_UMD

Add to Calendar 08/24/20 12:00 PM 08/24/20 1:00 PM America/New_York "Where Do You Know From? Antiracist Pedagogies"

Professor Eugenia Zuroski (Associate Professor, McMaster University, Canada) and Aisha Wilks (PhD Student, McMaster University) discuss Antiracist pedagogies, beginning with Zuroski’s essay, "Where Do You Know From?’: An Exercise in Placing Ourselves Together in the Classroom." 

Q&A moderated by Lee Konstantinou and Tita Chico.

For more information contact: Tita Chico (tchico@umd.edu).
Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, the Stringer Speaker Series, the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and the Graduate School.

           
Bios
Eugenia Zuroski is Associate Professor of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University, Editor of Eighteenth-Century Fiction, and author of A Taste for China: English Subjectivity and the Prehistory of Orientalism (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Hovering, Seen (Toronto: Anstruther Press, 2019). She also published “Holding Patterns: On Academic Knowledge and Labor,” an essay about refusing the neoliberal university's treatment of race as "value added," and insisting on it as a foundation of knowledge and expertise.
 
Aisha Rose Wilks is a PhD student in the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University. A recipient of the Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, she is interested in diasporic kinship, embodiment, and the intimacies of violence in contemporary fiction. Her doctoral research takes place at the intersection of Black Studies and Mad Studies, exploring madness as a response to, recapitulation of, and refuge from the carceral-colonial state in literature of the Black Transatlantic. In her pedagogical practice, Aisha draws on her relationships to/in Tkaronto (Toronto), in Dish with One Spoon territory, and Jamaica; five years of anti-oppressive, feminist work in the non-profit sector; and an enduring sense of ambivalence to foster access and equity. She is on Twitter @most_articulate.
 

Follow the Conversation @UMDEnglish

#antiracismUMD
#CLCS_UMD

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