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"Invisible Bondage: The Other Side of Working on Shakespeare and Race in the Age of Covid-19"

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"Invisible Bondage: The Other Side of Working on Shakespeare and Race in the Age of Covid-19"

College of Arts and Humanities | English Tuesday, September 8, 2020 4:00 pm-5:00 pm

What does it mean to be in bondage to the work—tilling the field of Shakespeare studies—in the age of Covid19? During this candid conversation, Dr. David Sterling Brown (Binghamton University, SUNY) and Dr. Arthur Little (UCLA) offer critical antiracist reflection on the oppressiveness of this historical moment as they distinguish between serving the work and letting the work serve.

For more information contact: Tita Chico (tchico@umd.edu).
Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, Petrou Lecture Series, the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and the Graduate School.

Bios
Dr. David Sterling Brown—a Shakespeare and premodern critical race studies scholar—is Assistant Professor of English at Binghamton University and executive board member of the Race Before Race conference series. His anti-racist scholarship is published or forthcoming in  Radical Teacher, Shakespeare Studies, Hamlet: The State of Play, The Sundial, White People in Shakespeare, The Hare, Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies, Shakespeare and Digital Pedagogy, and other venues. And his forthcoming book project examines how the Du Boisian color-line operates in Shakespearean drama.

Dr. Arthur L. Little is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current book projects include Shakespeare and Race, White People in Shakespeare (editor), and Black Hamlet: Disciplining Race, Memory, and the Geno-Performative.

Q&A moderated by David Carroll Simon + Tita Chico.

Follow the Conversation @UMDEnglish

#antiracismUMD
#CLCS_UMD

Learn more about the Antiracism Series

Add to Calendar 09/08/20 4:00 PM 09/08/20 5:00 PM America/New_York "Invisible Bondage: The Other Side of Working on Shakespeare and Race in the Age of Covid-19"

What does it mean to be in bondage to the work—tilling the field of Shakespeare studies—in the age of Covid19? During this candid conversation, Dr. David Sterling Brown (Binghamton University, SUNY) and Dr. Arthur Little (UCLA) offer critical antiracist reflection on the oppressiveness of this historical moment as they distinguish between serving the work and letting the work serve.

For more information contact: Tita Chico (tchico@umd.edu).
Co-sponsored by the University Libraries, Petrou Lecture Series, the Office of Graduate Diversity and Inclusion and the Graduate School.

Bios
Dr. David Sterling Brown—a Shakespeare and premodern critical race studies scholar—is Assistant Professor of English at Binghamton University and executive board member of the Race Before Race conference series. His anti-racist scholarship is published or forthcoming in  Radical Teacher, Shakespeare Studies, Hamlet: The State of Play, The Sundial, White People in Shakespeare, The Hare, Early Modern Black Diaspora Studies, Shakespeare and Digital Pedagogy, and other venues. And his forthcoming book project examines how the Du Boisian color-line operates in Shakespearean drama.

Dr. Arthur L. Little is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current book projects include Shakespeare and Race, White People in Shakespeare (editor), and Black Hamlet: Disciplining Race, Memory, and the Geno-Performative.

Q&A moderated by David Carroll Simon + Tita Chico.

Follow the Conversation @UMDEnglish

#antiracismUMD
#CLCS_UMD

Learn more about the Antiracism Series

Cost

Free